Hit and Run Laws in

Nevada


NRS 484.219 Duty to stop at scene of accident involving death or personal injury; penalty.

1. The driver of any vehicle involved in an accident on a highway or on premises to which the public has access resulting in bodily injury to or the death of a person shall immediately stop his vehicle at the scene of the accident or as close thereto as possible, and shall forthwith return to and in every event shall remain at the scene of the accident until he has fulfilled the requirements of NRS 484.223.

2. Every such stop must be made without obstructing traffic more than is necessary.

3. A person failing to comply with the provisions of subsection 1 is guilty of a category B felony and shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for a minimum term of not less than 2 years and a maximum term of not more than 15 years and by a fine of not less than $2,000 nor more than $5,000.

(Added to NRS by 1969, 1482; A 1979, 1484; 1983, 1066; 1993, 2135; 1995, 1297)

NRS 484.223 Duty to give information and render aid.

1. The driver of any vehicle involved in an accident resulting in injury to or death of any person or damage to any vehicle or other property which is driven or attended by any person shall:

(a) Give his name, address and the registration number of the vehicle he is driving, and shall upon request and if available exhibit his license to operate a motor vehicle to any person injured in such accident or to the driver or occupant of or person attending any vehicle or other property damaged in such accident;

(b) Give such information and upon request manually surrender such license to any police officer at the scene of the accident or who is investigating the accident; and

(c) Render to any person injured in such accident reasonable assistance, including the carrying, or the making of arrangements for the carrying, of such person to a physician, surgeon or hospital for medical or surgical treatment if it is apparent that such treatment is necessary, or if such carrying is requested by the injured person.

2. If no police officer is present, the driver of any vehicle involved in such accident after fulfilling all other requirements of subsection 1 and NRS 484.219, insofar as possible on his part to be performed, shall forthwith report such accident to the nearest office of a police authority or of the Nevada Highway Patrol and submit thereto the information specified in subsection 1.

(Added to NRS by 1969, 1483)

NRS 171.085 Limitations for felonies.

Except as otherwise provided in NRS 171.083, 171.084 and 171.095, an indictment for:

1. Theft, robbery, burglary, forgery, arson, sexual assault or a violation of NRS 90.570 must be found, or an information or complaint filed, within 4 years after the commission of the offense.

2. Any felony other than murder, theft, robbery, burglary, forgery, arson, sexual assault or a violation of NRS 90.570 must be found, or an information or complaint filed, within 3 years after the commission of the offense.

[1911 Cr. Prac. § 72; RL § 6922; NCL § 10720]—(NRS A 1963, 371; 1977, 1630; 1985, 2167; 1997, 890; 2001, 3031; 2003, 273)

Source

Article

KLAS TV 3/17/05

(Mar. 14) -- A measure  (SB 141) to toughen penalties for drivers who leave the scene of an accident is expected to clear the Nevada Senate Tuesday. The bill, in part, is inspired by a 2001 collision that killed three people and seriously injured a fourth. (passed 20 - 1)

On April 22, 2001, James and Holly Barton and their son Ben never make it to church. A car driven by Mitchell Dettloff strikes their Ford pick-up sending it across the median head-on into on-coming traffic. The crash kills three and seriously injures a fourth.

The driver who caused the crash, Mitchell Dettloff, never stops.

The one person who's required by law to help out fled the scene. A jury found Dettloff guilty of, among other things, three counts of leaving the scene of an accident, one count for each victim.

On appeal, the Nevada Supreme Court overturned two of those convictions finding that a driver can only leave the scene once.

Dennis Nolan, (R) Clark County Senator, said, "The way the law is right now, there's more of an incentive for people who are involved in accident, especially DUI accidents, to leave the scene and try to avoid the DUI conviction and opt out for a lesser charge of leaving the scene of an accident."

Dettloff v. State, 120 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 67(September 16, 2004). “Appellant Mitchell Dettloff appeals a judgment of conviction entered upon jury verdicts of guilty on three felony counts of leaving the scene of an accident. As a threshold matter, we have determined to reverse and vacate two of the three convictions under our recent decision in Firestone v. State, which prohibits multiple convictions in connection with leaving the scene of a single accident.

From Nevada Legislature site

SB 141- Increases term of imprisonment under certain circumstances for driver of vehicle who leaves scene of accident involving bodily injury to or death of person. (BDR 43-362)
Introduced On: Feb 25, 2005
By: Transportation and Homeland Security
Most Recent History Action: May 21, 2005 - (Pursuant to Joint Standing Rule No. 14.3.3, no further action allowed.)
Passed Senate - died in Assembly



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This page is added for reference only. Laws may have been changed since and information shown may be incomplete or erroneous. Use of this information is at users risk and only an accredited attorney can advise you of the exact law in each state. This page deals with state leaving the scene laws only and hit and run drivers may face other charges.


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